Posts

It’s hard to follow that advice when you’re a visible Jew in the middle of the Ukraine…

There’s a popular ‘theme’ that’s taken TikTok – and other social media – by storm, which involves people doing suspicious things, all the while muttering ‘don’t be suspicious, don’t be suspicious’ to themselves.

Every now and then, my kids have shown me a take on the ‘don’t be suspicious’ theme that particularly tickled them, like a dog running down the road while ‘don’t be suspicious’ plays in the background’ or people walking funny; or doing ‘suspicious’ things like painting their sister’s bedroom walls deep black.

Yesterday, Baruch Hashem, we got back from almost a month in the Ukraine, and if I had to pick a theme for our trip there, it would be: don’t be suspicious.

That’s pretty much what I was telling my kids ten times a day, as tried to make the best of our 3 ½ week odyssey in Uman.

====

Bits of the story you got from the blog, but it was only when I finally got home late last night – and promptly had a small but significant nose bleed – that I started to realise just how stressful the last few weeks really were.

You should know something about me:

I hate breaking the rules.

Maybe it’s a throwback to being raised in anally-retented Britain, but unless I have a very powerful reason to not obey a rule, I will do what I’m told. So it is, that I’m one of those rare people in Israel who will pay everything I officially owe on my taxes; and who won’t illegally dig out a 200 sqm basement for my house; and who won’t claim benefits I’m not owed, or try to board buses or trains without making sure I have a paid ticket.

But the last few weeks, the ‘rules’ have been bent so many times by all these corrupt government and officials all over the world, that even I am finding it hard to abide by them.

====

When I booked my ticket for Uman, on August 26th, 2020, the Ukrainian government had just announced that it was closing its borders to tourists from August 29th, 2020 – thanks to the pressure being applied to it by Netanyahu and Gamzu, ahead of Uman, Rosh Hashana 5781.

It took me and my family the best part of a day to run through airports in Israel, France and Portugal before finally making it to Kiev in the wee hours of August 28th – almost a full day ahead of when the airports were meant to officially close to tourists.

In other words, I was travelling totally legally.

But the State of Israel pressured Ukraine to close its borders illegally to religious Jewish pilgrims on their way to Uman for Rosh Hashana, 24 hours before Ukrainian law said they were to close.

And so, when I landed in Zhuliany Airport, my and my family were treated like criminals by the Ukrainian border guards.

====

We watched one non-Jewish, non-religious tourist after another get released before us.

We were left until last, and the border guards forced us to sign an illegal deportation order – in Ukrainian – without telling us what it said, then they told us that our ‘free’ flight back to Israel would be at 10am that same morning, Friday, August 28th, 2020.

They totally lied.

Around 9am, after we’d already been waiting in the closed business lounge of Zhuliany for 4 hours, and still no information about our ‘flight back’ to Israel, I went to find out what was going on.

Wait until 10am, I will have more information for you, is what I was told.

At 10am, I found that the ‘information’ was that the border guards ended their shift at 10am, so then we would become someone else’s problem to deal with.

At that stage, I started to panic, and them me and my kids started calling everyone we could think of, to help us out of a situation that we did not create, and did not expect, but which was 100% the fault of the anti-semitic State of Israel.

====

Over the next couple of hours, we tried all the people you are meant to try, when you’re ‘in trouble’ abroad.

The message we got back from the Israeli embassy in Ukraine is that we were totally on our own, with no sympathy from them, and that’s what you get when you try to get to Uman for Rosh Hashana when the State of Israel doesn’t want you to go.

Initially, Chabad in Kiev also wasn’t prepared to help us at all, and we even got a message from Uman that the Rav there also couldn’t do anything for us.

====

Never mind, that we’d been detained by the Ukrainian government illegally.

Never mind, it was Shabbat in eight hours and we didn’t have ANYTHING we could eat in the airport. Never mind, that the Ukrainian guards were becoming increasingly nasty to us, culminating in taking us out in a bus to the middle of the airfield, where 7-8 armed guards basically laughed at us, while a Rottweiler was set loose to circle the bus and keep us inside, mamash like those films you see from the shoah.

One of my teens secretly filmed that sadistic episode.

It’s only when one of my kids got in touch with a friend back in Israel who has some serious protektzia and sent her that ‘holocaust clip’ that things started to move, a little. That’s when we got a call from the Israeli consul that they’d arranged for Chabad Kiev to bring us some food for Shabbat, if we would order it from a local kosher restaurant and pay for it ourselves.

====

In the meantime, I found out there were no direct flights to Israel from that airport, ever.

I also found out that the next indirect flight out to Israel was departing via Minsk, Belarus, on Sunday afternoon – almost 72 hours later.

My heart sank.

But I still bought the tickets, because at least then I knew I could get out of the airport then.

In the meantime, friends back in Israel were galvanizing other more sympathetic and helpful members of Chabad, Kiev; and unbeknownst to me, my husband was also making a powerful public case for the 120 pilgrims who had been similarly trapped by the State of Israel’s dirty tricks in Kiev’s other main airport, Borispol.

20 minutes before Shabbat, some massive miracle happened and we were summarily given permission to leave Zhuliany.

In the taxi that took us to the kosher hotel in Kiev, after 2 days of trying to keep it all together, the tears finally welled up, and I cried for a good 10 minutes.

Even though I really did know that God was behind everything, and even though I was really trying to have emuna, and to believe that everything was going to turn around for the best, it was still a very traumatic experience.

====

Over Shabbat, I had a full and frank discussion with my family about whether we should just go home on Sunday, as planned, or now continue on to Uman.

In the end, we decided that staying together as a family was the over-riding consideration, so with a heavy heart, I continued on to Uman – at 3am in the morning, to try and avoid the roadblocks we’d heard a rumor the mayor of Uman was threatening to set up around the town.

Honestly?

I was also really scared to go anywhere near a Ukrainian airport again.

And on top of that, the State of Israel was issuing one threat after another about forcing people who went to Uman into ‘Corona Motels’ as soon as they landed back in the Aretz, and forcing them to have triple nasal swabs, and forcing them to have a number tattoo’d on their arm so they’d be easier to track, when they returned…

O, sorry. One of those things I made up.

But it all meant I was in no rush to fly back to Ben Gurion.

====

So anyway, we got Uman, and the whole time I was basically trying to tell my loud, conspicuously Israeli teenagers don’t be suspicious!!!

Don’t speak Hebrew too loudly in the street, don’t draw attention to yourselves, don’t do anything that could get us in any trouble with the Ukrainians!!!

Some hope.

Every time we passed a body of water, I’d have a fight with one of them not to just jump into it fully clothes, like she does back in Israel.

And I’d have a fight with one of them to not barter too rudely with the local vendors and taxi drivers; and not to start cursing the ‘anti-semitic Ukrainians’ too loudly in English, or even in Hebrew, which many of them actually understood pretty well.

Meanwhile, other of my teenage cohorts were off buying massive-bladed hunting knives for their friends back home, while they kept getting stopped by the police asking them if they smoking marijuana and trying to pat them down. They weren’t. Not even a little bit. But they look like they could be.

Let’s just say, I spent a lot of time in the Ukraine clapping my hands, to ‘sweeten the judgments’.

====

Nevertheless, the first two weeks we were there, it was basically OK.

True, we still got suspicious looks from the locals at the market, although some of the Ukrainians were actually pretty friendly, truth be told. It’s hard to dislike people who are spending their money at your stall, although clearly still possible.

We branched out a little, and went to Gan Sofia – the local landscaped Victorian park and lake – a couple of times; and to the Baal Shem Tov and Rav Natan’s graves, another day.

Medzhiboz and the Baal Shem Tov was actually a pretty depressing experience this time around.

My and my husband were outnumbered 3:1 by the Ukrainian workers cementing in ancient fragments of graves around the ohel, and we ended up spending just a scant 30 minutes by the BESHT.

There was something kinda creepy of being in that graveyard alone, with only Ukrainians for company, despite the BESHT’s obvious kedusha.

Rav Natan’s grave was a better experience, at least for me, and I managed to grab hold of my soul for a few moments, amidst all the ongoing worry and fear about the situation.

====

But by the third week, the State of Israel’s propaganda about frum Jews being ‘disease vectors’ for COVID-1984 had gone full throttle, and was being amplified throughout the local press in Uman.

Market vendors made sure to pull their masks way up over their nose, when I approached their stalls to buy potatoes or fruit, now.

Shopkeepers eyed us suspiciously.

Roadblocks appeared at both ends of Pushkina Street, and all of a sudden, the Ukrainian police presence in Uman conspicuously shot through the roof.

Don’t be suspicious, don’t be suspicious…

I kept telling my kids, like a mantra.

====

One of them got me 100% – she was picking up the growing ‘anti-semitic’ vibe herself, and was increasingly desperate to get home.

The other one is just 17, and still retarded. So it was much harder to keep her in ‘low profile’ mode, and not trying to mouth off to the four different types of police officers as she hung out with her new friends on the corner of Pushkina.

There were:

  • The ‘standard’ Ukrainians police, who are there all the time and basically 100% bribable by the locals, so pose no real threat.
  • The ‘VIP’ guards of the kever, appointed by the Breslov committee when they were trying to ‘COVID-1984’ Rabbenu 2000%, to try to persuade the State of Israel to let more pilgrims in, especially those stuck on the border of Belarus. They weren’t really scary, even when they were bundling people out of the kever for the ‘crime’ of standing still to pray mincha, as they were being paid for by Jews.
  • The all-black ‘ninja’ police, who conspicuously carried real blackwood truncheons, and had a bunch of scary looking tattoos and liked to ‘amuse themselves’ by shadow boxing by themselves off down a side alley. I hated walking past those guys, especially at night.
  • The black-with-raspberry-beret police, who stuck me as being paramilitary, and probably unnerved me the most, as they hung out in packs next to the free coffee place on Pushkina.

====

On the flight home, I found out there was a fifth group of ‘yassamnikim’ police from Israel, who are basically Ukrainian-Israelis, and who look VERY scary, with their shaved heads, tattooed biceps and special rucksacks that have the emblems of Ukraine and the State of Israel entwined together.

There were only 3 of them this year, and I have to say that wearing a mask AND A VISOR on the plane home kinda dulled their ‘hard man’ status, at least for me, but on the streets of Uman, they were probably still imposing.

====

So, with all that police muscle walking around, I spent at least an hour every single day drumming into my family’s head: don’t be suspicious! Don’t be suspicious!

But honestly?

A Jew in galut is always ‘suspicious’ to the locals, and can never really feel as though they are ‘home’, even somewhere as holy as Uman.

====

There was so much good that came out of the trip, even though it was so hard in so many ways.

My kids now understand way more what a present we gave them, when we moved to Israel.

As a family unit, we all also learned how to tolerate and appreciate each other more – especially when we’d be stuck in the house for long periods of time, basically feeling too intimidated to really go out anywhere.

Now I’m back in Israel in the middle of Jerusalem, in the middle of another deceitful lockdown, in the middle of an enforced two week quarantine where I am forbidden from leaving my house, I’m sure that experience will come in handy.

Also, the second day of Rosh Hashana just felt really light and happy, in Uman, as though the decrees all got sweetened.

====

There’s always so much I can write about Uman, especially this trip, especially this year, but I think I’ll stop there for now.

By the time Rosh Hashana 5781 started, the ‘snake’ that had been devouring the kedusha at Rabbenu’s tomb had been totally dismantled, and most people had ditched their masks, most of the time.

It felt to me as though Rabbenu has dismantled COVID-1984, as I so hoped he would, and that now it’s just a matter of time before ‘COVID-1984’ – and the evil people behind it – also crumbles to nothing in Israel and the rest of the world, too.

If Rav Berland is right, already by Yom Kippur, there should be a strong light at the end of the tunnel.

This lockdown is set to continue until October 9th – the last month of pregnancy.

Between here and November, I think a lot of things are going to happen, BH including the open revelation of Moshiach.

But whatever is on the cards, one thing is clear:

It’s going to be a big year.

====

PS: Now I’m back home, and finally starting to decompress from the events of the last month, I hope to be more responsive on my blog, and via email again. Thanks for your patience, dear friends and readers. It’s been a really stressful time.

====

You might also like these articles:

Even when the body is being locked down, our souls can still join together this Rosh Hashana.

Man, it’s been a tough day mentally today.

Word on the street is that despite Ron Lauder getting involved (!) to send a letter to the Ukrainian PM Zelensky telling him just how important Uman, Rosh Hashana is for Breslov chassidut (!), the answer is still a nyet for those amazing Jews stuck in no-mans-land at the Gomel crossing in Belarus.

There are no coincidences in the world, and it is totally no coincidence that those amazing, emuna-dik Jews have been dancing and praying with tremendous kavana (and also sleeping rough outside with very little food for 3 nights…) in Gomel.

This comes from the myjewishlearning website:

Birkat Hagomel (pronounced beer-KHAT hah-GOH-mel), sometimes known as “benching gomel,” is commonly said after recovering from serious illness but can also be recited in gratitude for completing a dangerous journey.

This blessing for deliverance is typically recited in the presence of a minyan, or prayer quorum, often in the synagogue following an aliyah to the Torah.

====

My take on this is that the tremendous mesirut nefesh of those 1,000 (plus 1,500 others, also stuck in Belarus but not at the Gomel crossing) has helped the world ‘recover’ from the ‘serious illness’ that has plaguing us all year, COVID-1984, and has also helped the Jewish people to finally complete the ‘dangerous journey’ that has been our 2,000 year long exile.

The amount of bizayon and suffering they went through is indescribable, and in their zchut the geula is coming fast, and the sweet way.

But still, it’s so sad that apparently they aren’t going to make it here for Rosh Hashana 5781 after all.

====

Then, there’s the heavy-handed police presence all over Pushkina that I wrote about HERE, that is making me and half the rest of my family feel like we just don’t want to go outside. At all.

But I have Rosh Hashana to prepare, so this morning I went with half my family in a taxi to a local super, to pick up the rest of what’s required to actually make yom tov.

The supermarket trip was surprisingly chilled and nice (outside the police state of Pushkina, it’s way, way more relaxed in every way).

But then, we got stopped coming back along Pushkina by a posse of 4 Ukrainian policemen, asking us for our papers.

We didn’t have our passports on us, so one of the policemen decided to get into the taxi – he practically sat on my lap, until the driver told him that Jews don’t hold by that sort of behavior, so he made a bit more space for me. Soo thoughtful….

Then, we get back to where we’re staying, we show him the passports clearly stamped with ‘August 28th’ – the last day a tourist could legally get into Ukraine for Uman, without special permission from the government – and then he starts Google translating questions in English like:

But you are women. Women not allowed here.

I thought his translation was off, so I tried to ask him what he was really trying to say.

Women not allowed here.

He typed back.

At that point – just before my blood pressure zoomed off through the roof, because what, after all this I’m going to get deported from Ukraine for being a woman?!?!? – one of the men in the household who knows a little Ukrainian told him da, da, women OK here.

Once he heard it from a man, the police guy took his mask off, asked for a cup of tea and then started joking about whether we’d poisoned it.

====

Two minutes later, he left.

And then I had another mini nervous breakdown because I already haven’t slept for 2 days in a row, for reasons not entirely obvious to me, and I’m not eating so much here, and I literally felt I was going to fall over.

I need a falafel, something, I moaned to my husband.

So we went down the street, and saw black-masked police stopping the 3 1/2 Jews on the street very few minutes to ask them for their documents.

There were also at least 3 local Ukrainian TV crews trying to get shots of Jews looking like disease-carrying COVID-1984 hotspots, and I felt pretty uncomfortable when I realised one cameraman had his lens focused on me. I pulled a really gross face, then started waving to the camera like he was my mum, or something.

That embarassed him enough to move another 500 metres down the road, away from me.

====

I came home and just felt so miserable about everything that is going on right now, both in Uman and Israel and everywhere else.

After the falafel, I went to bed to do some quiet hitbodedut for an hour, as the Tziyon is now closed to women.

I felt much calmer afterwards, although still a bit shaky and exhausted.

My middot are just really not up to this test. At all. And we’re still in the middle of the test, with no obvious end in site.

Then my husband came back from the kever, and told me with obvious surprise:

They took the snake away. The Kever is pretty much back to normal again. There are people davening there and praying there again.

I was so pleased.

At least that.

====

Then, I went over to the Breslovnews.com website, which is in English, and I read this article, which really spoke to me about the ‘test’ that we’re all going through right now, especially in the Breslov community:

When I reflect on the insanity of the current situation and the multifarious experiences centered around the issue of Uman 2020 within the Breslov world, I get the feeling that Rabbeinu HaKadosh is putting us to the test here, each of us in our own way – granting us all a glorious opportunity to put various facets of his teachings to work.

The author then lists about 15 different tests related to staying at home for Rosh Hashana 5781, or trying to get here, and succeeding or failing, and lists different teachings from Rabbenu that are linked to each one. It gave me so much chizzuk to read it, and I’ve asked permission to reprint the whole article here. But in the meantime, you can go to the Breslovnews site and read it in situ.

====

Then I read about the global Tikkun Haklali, which is recited every Erev Rosh Hashana in Uman, and will be read again tomorrow too, at 12pm Israel time, 5am New York Time.

I will be your shaliach here, for that Tikkun Haklali.

Just be sure to recite it wherever you happen to be, at the same time, and have in mind that I’m your shaliach in Uman for that prayer, and God will consider it as though you said it here.

Even though the forces of evil have mamash succeeded in keeping us all apart on the physical plane, in so many different ways, tomorrow we can still have spiritual achdut.

We can still join together in prayer, each in our own little corner, and bind ourselves to the tzaddik and to Hashem, and to the kibbutz here in Uman.

The Tikkun Klali in Uman will be broadcast live tomorrow here:

====

Gosh, I can’t wait to be rid of this difficult year.

BH, 5781 will be so much better.

We will be rescued from all serious illnesses and dangerous journeys, and moshiach and geula will finally unfurl the sweet way.

====

Let me end by asking forgiveness for anything I wrote here that upset any of my readers in any way.

I’m definitely still a work in progress, and my middot are sometimes really bad, sorry.

Also, I forgive anyone and everyone unconditionally for anything they said or did to me this year, including the a-holes that hacked my site.

I forgive you!

And may we all have a sweet, blessed 5781.

====

UPDATE:

I got permission from the Breslovnews.com website to republish the article in full. Here it is:

By Reb Yaakov Klein of the Lost Princess Initiative – The Lost Princess Initiative

I know that people feel very passionately about the subject at hand. I have listened to and processed many of the arguments on both sides, having been back, and forth, and then back again myself. At the end of the day, I don’t know whether there is a clear “right” or “wrong” on the Uman issue. As R’ Chaim Kramer put it, “I can’t tell you to go and I won’t tell you not to go.” To my knowledge, there is no prophet in this generation who can definitively tell us one way or another. A person who approaches the conversation with an open mind will find that there are plenty of fair points on either side. But without trying to answer The Question of “what is one to do” – something Rebbe Nachman himself always shied away from (see Chayei Moharan 430) – the reality is that by virtue of the varied opinions, propensities, proclivities, circumstances, and personal feelings on the matter, the “Uman-goers” have been divided into many camps this year.

When I reflect on the insanity of the current situation and the multifarious experiences centered around the issue of Uman 2020 within the Breslov world, I get the feeling that Rabbeinu HaKadosh is putting us to the test here, each of us in our own way – granting us all a glorious opportunity to put various facets of his teachings to work.

– Those who feel compelled to travel at all costs are being charged with “conquering Hashem” by not capitulating to His decree (Sichos HaRan 69 and Likutei Moharan 124), and doing their utmost to overcome any barriers that stand in their way. (Likutei Moharan Tinyana 46, 48)

– Those who travel only to be turned back are being charged with rejoicing in the knowledge that they tried their best and that the main thing is the desire. (Sichos HaRan 12)

– Those who feel that this is simply not the year to go to Uman must hold firm to the tzaddik’s declarations that “fanaticism is not necessary”, and that “even while acting with simplicity, it is forbidden to be a fool,” (Sichos HaRan 51) as well as his teachings against obstinacy. (Chayei Moharan 431)

– Those who have sacrificed to spend Rosh Hashana with Rabbeinu and indeed managed, with great personal difficulty, to arrive in Uman must try their best to judge favorably those that didn’t even make an attempt, seeking to find the good points even in what – from their perspective – represents a gross miscalculation. (Likutei Moharan 282.)

– Those stuck between borders, faced with lines of impassive soldiers with riot gear as their children cry for water, are charged with finding the presence of Hashem even in the dark clouds of their suffering. (Likutei Moharan 33, 115, 195)

– Those who endure unspeakable waiting times along their travels to the resting place of our Rebbe are granted an opportunity to fulfill the teaching of “Hamtein”, putting their Breslover patience to work. (Likutei Moharan 6)

– Those who will, for the first time in decades, be spending Rosh Hashana away from Rabbeinu’s kibbutz and far removed from the spirit of the Breslover chassidim, must try their very best to remain joyous within their situation (Likutei Moharan Tinyana 24), hold tight to their faith in Hashem’s hashgacha (Likutei Moharan 250), and think only positive thoughts on Rosh Hashana. (Sichos HaRan 21)

– Those who are utterly confused, frustrated, and angry over this issue and can’t seem to find Hashem in any of this are charged with putting the Rebbe’s lesson of “Ayeh” to the test (Likutei Moharan Tinyana 12) and allowing the tzaddik’s silent songs of faith to reveal Hashem’s presence within the void. (Likutei Moharan 64)

– Those who will be joining together with other Breslover chassidim in special minyanim throughout the world are given the opportunity to truly believe that – as Reb Nosson taught – wherever Breslover chassidim gather, Rebbe Nachman’s spirit hovers upon them.

– Those who have been subject to ridicule by those who can’t possibly understand the unique Breslover Consciousness are charged with remaining silent in their experience of shame (Likutei Moharan 6) and judging the bullies favorably. (Likutei Moharan 277)

– Those who find themselves in the strangest, most God-forsaken places along their journey toward the place of their yearning are given the opportunity to remember that wherever a person travels, there is something for him to fix in that specific place. (Sichos HaRan 85)

– All are charged with taking responsibility for the collective suffering of our world (Likutei Moharan 4), with calling out to Hashem in personal prayer to request the final redemption (Likutei Moharan Tinyana 25), and with dancing the broken-hearted dance of humility to sweeten the judgments (Likutei Moharan 10).

– All are charged with crying tears of hope and joy (Likutei Moharan 175), believing that no matter where we might end up this Rosh Hashana, that’s exactly where we were supposed to be – because this is all part of Hashem’s master-plan. Like puppets in the hand of the master Puppeteer, all we know is that in the end it will be good, because despite all outward appearances, Hashem is running the world “better and better” all the time. (Sichos HaRan 307)

– All are charged with feeling the sheer power of this particular tzaddik’s spiritual-gravitational pull on thousands of souls in our generation (Likutei Moharan 70) – to the point that many were compelled to make sacrifices that so infuriated others solely because this degree of commitment to a cause (something they are personally unable to fathom) makes them a bit more uncomfortable than they are willing to admit.

In sum, we are once again experiencing the realization of Rebbe Nachman’s promise that “I will make you into many groups.” (Chayei Moharan 319) But at the end of the day, no matter where you stand on this glorious spectrum of heated debate and sensitivity, we are all bound with the spirit of this singular tzaddik whose life-giving waters flow in a great many directions. So no matter where we find ourselves this Rosh Hashana, let’s hold tight to these teachings with great joy and unity, roaring like animals in the field – as Rabbeinu wanted – for a time when the light of Hashem and His tzaddikim will envelop the world in a wondrous blanket of illumination with the coming of Moshiach, b’mheira b’yameinu.

ASHREINU!

 

I just wrote a whole big post that deleted itself before I saved it.

Here are the main points:

  1. Rabbi and Rabbanit Arush have made it to Uman.
  2. Around 2,000 Jews are still stuck at the border of Belarus, which is now starting to head into massive civil unrest, with 200,000 people marching on the capital in Minsk. If you can do anything to help those Jews, please do so, and if you can’t do anything practical, please pray for them.
  3. Some more people are trickling into Uman.
  4. There is a ‘plan’ to let 7,000 Jews come to Uman, under harsh rules that are straight out of Comrade Stalin’s era.
  5. I am seeing a light at the end of the tunnel – but it’s still very up and down. More and more people, Jews and non-Jews, are starting to question the narrative, fight back against facemask tyranny, and are refusing to be cowed into ‘lockdowns’ that have no science to back them up, and are 100% political, and part of trying to emasculate the populace.
  6. Self-sacrifice is what will get all this bad stuff to finally shake out and fall apart. So even if you aren’t a Breslover yourself, and even if you don’t ‘get’ what the big deal is about Uman Rosh Hashana, still appreciate that the mesirut nefesh being shown by so many of your fellow Jews is what is actually going to save us all from Corona fascism, and the dark eugenics agenda behind it.
  7. Rav Berland said that if COVID-1984 wasn’t over by Tisha B’av, then it would be over by Yom Kippur – so we are in the home stretch, hang on.

Also, someone just sent me some comments where the Rav apparently said that geula is imminent, and will begin in Elul.

I haven’t heard that first-hand, tho, so buyer beware.

BH, I will try to post something longer next time, if it doesn’t get deleted.

Also – thanks to everyone for their kind comments and messages. I have limited time online, so please forgive me for taking a while to respond, or even not responding.

TBC

====

 

It’s not against COVID-1984, or against corrupt government officials.

The real war to be fought here is against our own bad middot, and especially our tavot mamon.

Ukrainians are notoriously stingy. Like, notoriously. We have been charged by a taxi for wanting to turn the airconditioning on, we’ve been charged extra for towels, extra for toilet paper, extra for taking especially big gulps of air (ok, that last one is a lie.)

Point is, money is definitely what makes the world go round in the Ukraine.

====

The landlord we’re renting from here in Uman is actually OK, as Ukrainians go, and has shown me a few kindnesses in the two days I’ve been here. He gave me pegs (for free…) He gave me bin bags (for free…) – but he was careful to tell me that I could only throw the bin bag out when it was totally full. And he’s also careful to let me know when the toilet flush gets stuck, so I don’t waste a grivna of his money on that trickle of unnecessary water.

A grivna is worth approximately half a cent.

And Ukraine is totally awash in water – it’s literally everywhere.

I’m not like this at all, so living in close quarters with such a stingy person is proving quite eye-opening. Not least, it’s showing me how very stressful it is, to have people like that around, always looking over your shoulder and critiquing your spending, like an in-house accountant. And it’s also showing me how much unnecessary pain and suffering all this stinginess and tavot mamon (lust for money) is bringing to the world.

====

This morning, our landlord finally managed to rent out the unit next to us.

The group of 8 Israelis who rented it got a really good deal, because our landlord is scared no-one else is coming out to Uman this year.

(He’s wrong, but he doesn’t know that yet.)

Usually, beds like his, in this location, in a reasonable apartment like his, go for at least $500 a head. This morning, he let the group have it for $180 a head, but he made the same condition that he made with us, that no-one else could come round to flat unless they were renting a bed in it.

I understand that condition.

I know it’s coming partially from a stingy place, but I also understand that the temptation to sneak another person in to sleep on a spare bed without paying may prove too strong for many people.

Long story short, the group invited two more people to come eat with them just now who aren’t renting there – and the landlord showed up, and asked them to pay more money.

They refused.

And then, instead of working it out like grown ups, the group of 8 decided to stand on principle and to leave. 

It was 6.30 at night, and their chances of finding somewhere else to sleep or rent right now are pretty small.

And for what? A few extra dollars? Whatever they think they saved, it’s going to cost them way more in hassle and effort.

====

This morning in the kever, I opened Rebbe Nachman’s Tales to the story of the Master of Prayer, where the Master of Prayer was taking the people of the Land of Money to task, for devoting their whole life to money.

Retarded people!!! Don’t you understand money is a tool, it’s a means to an end, not an end in and of itself!!! Why waste so much effort, so much energy, trying to conserve a couple of bucks, or trying to squeeze a couple more bucks out of other people?!?

(Clearly, I’m paraphrasing what Rabbenu said here.)

I have seen so many people sour relationships and cause massive emotional damage to others, especially their children and spouses, by making their money, their bank account, their principal priority in life.

Personally, I am at a stage that I literally can’t stand all this stingy ayin hara over money any more.

I can’t stand the people who criticise others for spending a little bit more on their groceries; or for giving some charity to askers who can’t be proven to be 100000% ‘kosher’; or who make it a big ‘mitzvah’ to try to screw prices down so hard (or inflate them so high) it literally hurts.

I can’t stand those people.

====

Recently, I read a prayer from the Rav, Rabbi Berland, which set up a clear correlation between the trait of stinginess and the ayin hara. People who have the first invariably have big problems with the second.

And that’s the whole war that we’re fighting right now, to convince all those people living n the Land of Money to finally give up on their false beliefs and destructive ideology.

Money is for spending.

Money is for sharing.

Money is for building the world, not boosting your investment portfolio.

Rebbe Nachman teaches very clearly that before Moshiach comes, anyone who has a lot of money will be totally shamed and disgusted by the money itself.

All those millionaires and billionaires, who could have helped so many people, done so many kindnesses, but preferred to continue to suck everyone else dry, and to take bribes, and to promote the agenda of evil in the world, just so they can have a few more zeros in the bank.

And what about us?

How much are we also stuck in the Land of Money, putting our savings ahead of helping our kids, or inviting guests for Shabbat, or even buying ourselves a new frock for the chag?

====

Money as we know it is about to disappear.

That’s why the tests involving money are becoming so sharp.

And that’s why God is checking us so carefully right now, to see how caught up in the lust for money, tavot maimon, we really are.

The more of us can kick free from it, and start to trust more in God and less in our savings and ability to manage money, the easier this next stage will go.

So, I give us all a blessing that we will replace our stingy, ayin hara with a generous ayin tova. That we will want to give to others generously. That we won’t worry about spending what we need to, in order to live and to celebrate Jewish holidays, and give ourselves and our families what we really need.

Because when enough of us get out of the Land of Money, Moshiach will come.

====

You might also like this article:

 

 

 

This morning, the world felt like a really heavy place.

I woke up, went to get some oatmeal and lentils from the Uman outdoor market (a place I never went to before, in the last 14 years of coming to Uman…) and the whole of Pushkina just kind of felt weird and quiet.

Later on, I found out why.

On Monday, a local visible Jew had gotten beaten up by locals at the end of the street  – right next to the supermarket I went to yesterday, without knowing what had happened the day before.

The guy had lived here for 10 years and knows the city. But thanks to Gamzu and Netanyahu’s efforts to turn the local populace against frum Jews, as being an unhygenic ‘public health’ threat, the guy was punched in the face badly enough that he bled profusely from his nose.

Thanks, State of Israel!

====

There was other weird stuff, too.

The 10 year old who runs the local kosher makolet suddenly got super makpid that everyone should wear a mask, if they wanted to come in and shop. When someone asked him why, he explained the police had been round ‘enforcing’ masks.

Thanks, State of Israel!

Also, there were a few clearly not Jewish people trying to shop (suspiciously…) in the kosher shop, and it seemed clear they were undercover Ukrainians working for the government, to check if the ‘dirty Jews’ were keeping the ‘hygiene laws’ properly.

Heyyy, wait a minute. Where have I heard that before?

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/8428324_In_the_Name_of_Public_Health_-_Nazi_Racial_Hygiene

The history of Nazi racial-hygiene policies and eugenics reminds us of the importance of guarding against the use of genetics for the purpose of discrimination.

====

Then, I went for a walk down Pushkina towards the lake, and I saw that the road had been dug up, like you would dig it up if there was a pipe that needed replacing.

But I peered down the 2 metre deep crevice dug horizontally across the bottom of Pushkina, and I can tell you there is nary a pipe in sight. It dawned on me that the roadblocks that the Mayor of Uman (also paid off by the State of Israel) has been threatening to implement for weeks already had finally arrived.

There was a smaller hole dug at the other end of Pushkina, too, as a matching pair.

====

Then, my kids got weird, as they’d heard back on the Israeli grapevine that the State of Israel is intending to dump everyone who comes to Uman into a COVID-1984 hotel upon return to the country.

We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it, I told them.

If the government lasts even 12 hours beyond Rosh Hashana 5781, I’ll be very surprised.

Because already by this afternoon, the Uman see-saw had swung back to optimistic again.

There were people back in the streets. There was music. The atmosphere lightened up considerably.

I don’t know what happened to change things around, but you could definitely feel the spiritual fight-back throughout the whole of Jewish Uman.

They won’t win.

They won’t win.

They are fighting Rabbenu now, and there is just no way they will win, this time around.

====

In the meantime, my landlord kindly showed up at the door with my ‘washing machine’ for the next 3 weeks – a big plastic bowl.

I was actually very grateful to him, as there is no laundrette here, and I only bought enough underwear to last a week.

This trip is teaching me the value of all the ‘small things’ I take for granted every single day.

Like, having a washing machine.

Like, being able to buy a kosher loaf of bread whenever I want – in so many different styles.

Like, being a Jew in a Jewish country, even though that country is far from perfect.

For sure, there will be more lessons to learn.

You can’t spend 3 weeks solid by Rabbenu without something massive shifting around.

And that thought is exhilarating – and also kinda scary.

====

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

====

You might also like this article:

The facemask fascism has now followed us here.

If you read my blog on a regular basis, you’ll know that I totally don’t buy into all the propaganda around ‘why we need to wear facemasks’ – or all the propaganda about Covid-1984, generally.

As soon as I hit Ben Gurion in the wee hours of Thursday morning, I was forced to wear a mask – over my nose! – pretty much non-stop (except in the toilet cubicles) through Charles de Gaulle and Lisbon airports, until we hit Zhuliany airport in the Ukraine.

There, we noticed a curious thing:

Hardly any of the Ukrainians were wearing facemasks at all, and very few of those who were wearing them were wearing them over their noses.

That was a silver lining amidst all the difficulty of being detained in Zhuliany airport for 17 hours, that at least no-one was enforcing full-on facemasks. That would have been unbearable.

==

When we got out to Kiev, I saw that less than one in 10 Ukrainians were wearing facemasks on the street – and my heart leapt with joy.

For the first time in months and months, I could walk around the streets without peering over my shoulder waiting for the Corona-fascist cops to fine me for not wearing a mask.

It was the first time I could really ‘breathe’ outside for about 4 months, as I live in Jerusalem where Corona Fascism is unfortunately flourishing.

We had the same sense of freedom when we first got to Uman, early Sunday morning. In the shops, some people were wearing masks, most people weren’t, and no-one was enforcing anything.

Already by today, that’s all changing.

Facemask fascism has caught up with me in Uman, and when I went to the pizza shop today, they were marking out the retarded ‘2 metre social distancing’ measurements on the floor with pink stickies.

Sigh.

==

At the kever of Rabbenu, big signs popped up like so many red and white mushrooms, telling us all to wear a mask, because the Rosh Hashana gathering in Uman depended on us being seen to follow the rules, and the fate of millions and billions of people were hanging on whether Rosh Hashana in Uman happens this year, or not.

At least with that last point, I couldn’t argue.

Rav Berland said a few weeks back that if 40,000 people got to Uman this year, the whole Corona plandemic would be cancelled and obliterated.

Halavai.

==

Just now I was in the women’s section by Rabbenu, still trying to get my head together after having 4 straight days of no sleep, 17 hours of incarceration at Zhuliany airport, one shabbos with 120 male chassids all squished into one hotel in Kiev, and (the most difficult of all…) approaching a week non-stop of spending time with my family.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my family, my kids, my husband and my daughter’s ‘plus one’, hopefully bashert.

But this morning, I started to feel so wobbly again inside.

God, when does this madness end? Not just the madness of me now being in Uman for three weeks, totally on the back foot and unprepared for that, but all this general madness, of feeling pursued by Corona fascism wherever in the world I go?

That’s how it feels at the moment, that I can’t get away from the tyranny, the obvious ‘bad’, the obvious evil that is happening here.

==

In Jerusalem, I tried to insulate myself from the madness by stocking my house with enough basic food staples to last us a month, if it had to, so we could wait out any ‘storm’ without having to go outside.

And now…. I’m here.

And all my couscous and tuna is there.

And here…. I don’t even know how the sugar looks, or have an oven to cook in.

These are small things, but today I felt them overwhelming me.

I am so unprepared for this. I can’t look after my family properly. I don’t have a washing machine, I don’t have any tea towels, and I’m here in Uman for 3 weeks over Rosh Hashana….

==

God has been very good to us.

We managed to rent a really good place within a couple of hours of arriving (apparently, that’s unheard of for Rosh Hashana, but with all the uncertainty, we probably found it easier than otherwise.)

In terms of Uman, Rosh Hashana, we are in a 3 roomed mansion that’s new, clean and has a big (traif…) kitchen. But the stove and sink are easily koshered, so I’m already cooking here, and there’s no oven to worry about in any case.

I’m two minutes from the kever, and our landlord is grumpy, but apparently one of the better Ukrainians we could be dealing with.

I know in so many ways I’m so lucky to be here.

And at the same time, my soul is just so very tired of all this, and can’t take any more of it.

==

Just now, I was in the kever and Shula, that permanent fixture of the ladies’ section, rushed in to tell us that we had to past the mivchan (the test) tomorrow.

Apparently, the president of the Ukraine is coming tomorrow, to check that we’re all wearing our masks and keeping our distance and praying in the retarded ‘capsules’ they’ve now set up on the mens’ side of the kever.

If we pass the test, word is they will open the borders to religious Jews, and Uman Rosh Hashana 5781 will happen after all.

Halavai.

==

Sigh.

Dear readers, my whole world is so upside down at the moment. I’m living in a country where a hand-turned wooden chopping board costs less than a single kosher bread roll, where the chickens are as big as ostriches, where the cucumbers look like prickly cactii, and where I have no idea where the ‘me’ is really meant to fit into this equation.

A woman in Uman in Rosh Hashana, with my two girls.

My laptop is at home in Jerusalem, with all the login info I need for my emails.

My books are there.

My garden is there.

My friends are there.

My baking equipment is there.

What am I doing here?

==

I guess God will show me when the time is right.

But in the meantime, events of the last week have really pushed me to the edge of my koach, and my ability to manage.

BH, Rebbe Nachman will help me to find the strength to bounce back.

==

You might also like this article:

It seems that Ukraine bent to the pressure from corrupt Netanyahu and Israel, to ban Jews coming to Uman for Rosh Hashana.

UPDATE:

This decree only comes in on Saturday, August 29th, 2020. There is time to go now, if you can! May God help us all to beat this horrible decree of COVID-1984 once and for all.

====

Ah.

I’ve just seen this;

https://www.ukrinform.net/rubric-society/3087826-ukraine-to-close-borders-to-foreigners-until-end-of-september.html

The darkness is sometimes so dark, isn’t it? But Rabbenu told us already, 200 years ago – ain shum yeoush be’olam klal!!!!

So, don’t give up if you or your loved ones have booked tickets for Uman this year.

If we keep dancing, and praying, and spreading the light of Rabbenu and Rav Berland around the world, everything can still all change.

All it takes is for a few more people to wake up and understand that we’re all being ‘played’ with COVID-19, and ‘global warming’ and all the other lies we’re being told.

The cracks are staring to show – even in the mainstream.

Take a look at this:

====

These people are going against Rabbenu now, and that is a step too far.

They are going to fall fast, and hard.

Just watch.

Ain shum yeoush be’olam klal.

We ARE going to be in Uman for Rosh Hashana, somehow or other. The small person is starting to stand up and roar all over the world.

And God’s light WILL shine out all over the globe.

And there is nothing anyone can do to stop that.

====

 

I’m back, and 28% refreshed from a few days holiday in the North.

It was a nice trip, as these things go, but I’m still feeling pretty knackered today… It’s hard to keep our batteries recharged at the moment, isn’t it, with so many things continually wearing them down again.

Anyway, I’m working on a series of ‘deep dive’ exposes about what’s really going on here, and I hope to have something meaty for you to dig your teeth into next week.

In the meantime, I just saw this video over on the ravberland.com website, of Rav Shalom Arush encouraging everyone very strongly to still go to Uman for this Rosh Hashana, 5781:

====

https://ravberland.com/rav-arush-this-is-the-last-uman-rosh-hashana-before-moshiach/

====

In the Levy household, we’ve been having a serious debate about Rosh Hashana this year. My husband has gone every year for the last 14 years, and he put his name down to go with Netivot tours a few weeks ago, too.

But then, the stories came out that the Ukraine was limiting the number of visitors from Israel to 5,000. Then, some other site said 10,000.

Then, the Yeshiva World [Fake] News website started running one story after another quoting Israeli officials who were trying to pressure the Ukrainian government into banning any Jewish visitors to Rabbenu this year, because of the fake Covid plandemic.

Like this one:

====

I went to look up who Dr Asher Salmon actually is.

He’s an oncologist – a cancer specialist – and deputy director of Hadassah Hospital.

He also happens to be Israel’s ‘go to’ man for that tool of the bunch of eugenicists behind COVID-1984, the World Health Organisation.

====

Each time you see one of these ‘medical experts’ being quoted in the fake news MSM, spend a minute to go and look them up.

I guarantee you will find that they are either directly linked to the WHO, and / or they are heading up organisations and ‘non-profits’ that are being funded directly by big Pharma and / or eugenics-promoting organisations like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, or the Rockefeller Institute.

(Many of them can also be directly linked to the Milken Institute, too, but that’s still harder to spot and a work in progress to bring those links more to the surface. But it’s coming. Believe me, it’s coming.)

====

So anyway, after we saw that video from Rav Arush, saying that this is the last Rosh Hashana before Moshiach, and promising massive spiritual benefits to anyone who makes it out there this year, I encouraged my husband to book ANOTHER ticket to Uman.

On a different date, a little earlier.

We are doing our bit.

====

Things are so changeable right now, who knows what the travel restrictions will actually look like, when we get there.

From what I can see from the headlines, ‘the evil plan’ is really NOT going to plan at all. Rav Berland sweetened it, exactly as he said he would, and now what’s going on is an increasingly desperate circus designed to keep the world’s population preoccupied while they try to get ‘the evil plan’ back on track.

Here in Israel, they have tried, and tried and tried so many times to reinstate a full lockdown, and for some bizarre reason, they just can’t do it.

More and more Israelis are waking up to the fact that COVID-1984 is a plandemic.

Fewer and fewer of us are buying the propaganda being churned out on sites like the Jpost and the Times of Israel and the Yeshiva World [Fake] News. And as we’re increasingly spotting the lies being told about COVID-1984, that is also translating into more and more people spotting the lies being told about everything else, too.

Like the Beirut Port bomb in Lebanon.

Like the ‘convenient’ nature of Hamas starting it’s fire balloons again now, for no other reason than to shore up Puppet Netanyahu and keep him in power long enough to deliver his end of ‘the evil plan’.

And all these planned and organised ‘spontaneous protests’, which are being jumped on by all the other corrupt MKs and ministers like Benny Gantz and Moshe Ya’alon, who are pretending to be serving the interests of the public, when really, they are just serving themselves and their masters in chul.

But we’re just not buying it anymore.

====

Let’s end this with some encouragement:

Go buy your ticket for Uman Rosh Hashana, and don’t be scared. Ladies, encourage your men to go even though it’s so very uncertain and stressful at the moment. Rabbenu is always our main line of defense, our key spiritual defender, for a good year.

And 5781 is shaping up to be the biggest year ever.

If the WHO is going to such great efforts to try to stop people from being in Uman for Rosh Hashana, that tells you how big, spiritually, it really is.

So go buy your ticket!!!

Because ‘the evil plan’ is on its last legs, and you definitely want a front row seat when all the spiritual light of geula starts to shine out into every corner of the world, from Uman this year.

====

You might also like this article:

 

 

 

Last week, I had a little nervous breakdown.

The only reason it was little, as opposed to BIG, is because on Thursday morning I told my husband that if I didn’t make it out to Uman for Shabbat, I was probably going to crack up into a million pieces.

The warning signs had been gathering steam for two weeks, but we were deep in a massive cash crunch, so there was just no way I could get to Uman. Then on Tuesday, I was chasing some receipts for my husband’s end of year when we realized we’d been accidentally overcharged for something by 4, 000 shekels – the cost of spending Shabbat in Uman.

So, my husband asked for repayment, and Thursday morning, we booked the flight.

Thank God, because I was in such a low place by that point, I felt like the sky was falling in.

Usually, I’m pretty open about what sparks all this stuff off, and I can tell you that I’m definitely dealing with a million and one big stressors at the moment, that have all been depleting my strength and challenging me. I’ll list them here, to make it neat, but that’s not really what sent me off the deep end.

  • I have to move apartment by end of Feb, and still haven’t found somewhere.
  • I have to complete the purchase of an apt in Harish by end of Feb, and the bank turned down the mortgage.
  • I have to complete my ‘Crush your stress’ masterclass (haha!) and start marketing it properly.
  • I have to somehow figure out tickets for trips to the US and UK for family simchas.
  • My kid wants to drop out of school again.
  • My other kid is leaving her National Service half way through the year

All these stressors could easily pass for ‘the reason I’m cracking up’, and in the past, I’ve made the mistake of thinking they are the root cause of my emotional distress.

====

But last week, I realized they are just the icing, not the cake.

The stuff that was really causing me to crack up last week is far more intangible. It just runs so deep, and goes to the heart of this whole idea of what I’m really meant to be doing in the world.

After 46 years, I realized that I’m still the perpetual weirdo, that I’m never going to see things the way other people do, or react to things ‘normally’, or be able to fit myself into the neat little boxes that apparently suit ‘everyone else’ – whoever the heck they are.

I’ve been fighting that clarity since I could think, because it brings a whole big bag of loneliness and self-doubt along with it. For four and a half decades, I’ve been waiting for me to mellow enough to fit in with the world, or for the world to speed up enough to keep up with me.

And last week, I finally understood that it’s never going to happen.

That understanding totally blew me out the water, and left me feeling like ET would feel once he understood the Mothership was never showing up to take him back home.

====

I am a perpetual weirdo, stuck in a place where no-one is ever going to ‘get’ me.

This has implications for a lot of things, not least all my ongoing attempts to keep trying to ‘brainwash’ people – including my family members – into seeing things and experiencing things the way I do.

Up until last week, I thought it was just a matter of time until everyone comes around and starts to pick up the same vibes I do about things. Just a bit more ‘Moshiach light’ needs to slip under the door, just a bit more ‘Moshiach consciousness’ needs to shine in through the windows, and they will finally understand.

But now, I accept that’s never going to happen.

So last week, I fled to Uman to get some advice about how I’m meant to relate to myself in this new paradigm.

====

Now I know I’m just never going to get that meeting of minds I’m craving, that sense of connection, now I know that I have to keep ‘the real me’ mostly under wraps if I want to have peaceful relationships and not cause constant friction, how do I relate to myself? How do I like myself?

How do I use all my ‘weirdness’ in a way that will still benefit the world, without causing me all this heartache because I feel so lonely and misunderstood so much of the time?

That’s why I came knocking on the door of Uman, the only place that makes me feel a little bit ‘normal’.

There was no bolt of lightning, no neon sign that suddenly lit up over the Tziyon saying

Rivka, do THIS!!!!! Be like THIS!!!! Just change THIS!!!!

But I came to Uman dragging a whole big chain of doubt, unhappiness and emotional pain behind me, and mostly, it’s gone.

I’m feeling connected back to my soul and connected back to God and the true Tzaddikim again. I have a lot to figure out still, but somehow, everything is going to turn out for the best.

And now, I have to get on with finding somewhere to live, and putting the finishing touches to my ‘Crush your stress’ course (haha!)

God certainly has a sense of humour.

====

You might also like this article:

5780: Did we turn the corner?

I don’t know about you, but I could describe the last few months of 5779 as some form of: hanging on by my fingernails.

That’s how it felt – for months!

I don’t know why, it just seemed like so many things were kind of permanently stuck, permanently dragging, permanently pointless. It was hard to get out of bed… It was hard to stay focused once I’d managed that part… It was so hard to keep going, to keep doing stuff, to keep my house clean, to keep making food for Shabbat, to keep saying my morning brachot, to go out for a walk.

Everything was such an effort, such a drag.

We are in to the fourth day of 5780, and what I can tell you is this:

The energy of this year is totally different from what came before.

Even Rosh Hashana felt so different this year.

Usually, I hunker down on Rosh Hashana, and wait for the feeling of oppressive din, and panic, and yirah to dissipate a little, so I can come out of hiding and stop holding my breath. The last few years, Rosh Hashana has been mostly difficult, for a whole bunch of reasons.

This year, for the first time in I don’t know how long, I can say that I came close to actually enjoying Rosh Hashana.

Me and the girls were out for two meals, home for the others, and none of us were stressed and fighting. Nobody was moaning that my husband was in Uman. No-one was stressing that they didn’t have the right thing to wear, or that their hair looked horrible (I’d like you to believe that last statement is referring to my children….)

We didn’t feel lonely, we didn’t feel out of place, we didn’t feel lost in the world or lacking.

Even more amazingly, I managed to find a body of water that the Jerusalem municipality couldn’t turn off for Rosh Hashana, to prevent residents from chucking their challah into it at tashlich.

So for the first time in at least five years, me and my girls all managed to do tashlich, and to actually do it on Rosh Hashana itself.

I spoke to someone yesterday who has also had quite a challenging few years here in the Holyland, and they said the same thing: there was a great feeling floating around on Rosh Hashana 5780.

There is hope in the air again, there is a light illuminating the path.

Dawn has finally broken.

That’s how it felt.

Now, I’ll guess we’ll see what happens next.

====

You might also like these articles: